This Aerial Footage Shows What Disneyland Looks Like Totally Empty

MediaNews Group/Orange County Re/Getty Images

Main Street USA sits empty right now.

This article originally appeared on Travelandleisure.com.

In March, officials at Disney made the decision to close its theme parks due to the spread of the Coronavirus. It marks the longest closure in Disney history. And now, we’re getting our first glimpse at what a completely empty Disneyland actually looks like.

KABC, a Disney-owned ABC affiliate in Los Angeles, recently shared 50 seconds of aerial footage of Disneyland, showing the incredibly rare view of a completely empty park.

As the Orange County Register notes, the footage shows the park sitting eerily still, missing the typical 51,000 visitors that usually visit each day.

The video begins with a quick overview of the drawbridge leading into Cinderella’s castle before panning out to view the entire park.

It then moves to the entrance of Disneyland, showing the iconic grass and flower Mickey head that usually welcomes visitors to the Happiest Place on Earth.

The video then shows a sweeping look at the empty Main Street USA, where thousands of fans usually line the sidewalks for daily parades.

The footage then zooms in on the brand-new Star Wars: Galaxy’s Edge attraction, which looks even more like a dystopian future space than ever before.

It then ends with a hovering shot of the iconic Matterhorn ride and its snowcapped peak, sitting empty, looking as though it’s just waiting for guests to return. However, no one is quite sure when visitors will be able to line up to take a ride in any of the parks again.

MediaNews Group/Orange County Re/Getty Images

"While there is still much uncertainty with respect to the impacts of COVID-19, the safety and well-being of our guests and employees remains The Walt Disney Company’s top priority," the company said in a statement in March about its decision to close the parks. "As a result of this unprecedented pandemic and in line with direction provided by health experts and government officials, Disneyland Resort and Walt Disney World Resort will remain closed until further notice."

However, there are two glimmers of hope in this crisis when it comes to Disney and its workers. The first is that Disney is still paying its workers through April 18. After that, it will furlough its employees, meaning they will not be paid but will still remain active.

The second is that Disneyland and Disney World are still taking reservations for June 1 onward, so there may indeed be a light at the end of this tunnel, so long as it’s deemed safe.