This New Mexico Resort is Saving Endangered Species—And You Can Help

Courtesy Ted Turner Reserves

Experts are seeing an increase in the booking of meaningful trips that give back.

Vermejo, a Ted Turner Reserve, is known for its luxe accommodations, top-notch dining, and world-renowned service situated on over 550,000 stunning acres of picturesque New Mexico lands. But it was Ted Turner’s vision to rewild the land and ecosystems, which has translated into various projects restoring the wildlife and their habitats on the property. And guests can help.

With access to nature at the core of the resort, guests can go horseback riding through open fields, mountain biking through the hills, or fly fishing for Rio Grande cutthroat trout. Beyond the outdoor adventure, though, the Ted Turner Reserves hospitality brand works closely with scientists from the Turner Endangered Species Fund to protect and rehabilitate the native ecosystems.

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The Vermejo landscape
Courtesy Vermejo

Efforts include re-establishing wild herds of genetically unique Castle Rock bison, restoring the Rio Grande cutthroat trout to the entire Costilla Creek watershed on the property, and captively breeding Bolson tortoise to prevent extinction. The team also conducts research to advance the conservation of the endangered Chiricahua leopard frog and release captive-raised Mexican wolves into the wild.

“Conservation and environmental stewardship are the core of our mission and DNA at Vermejo,” Jade McBride, managing director, told Departures. “Our guests understand this intention as they look for ways to connect to the natural world. We are passionate about providing them with experiences that touch their hearts and souls and also serve a greater purpose.”

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A man holding a trout in the water at Vermejo
Courtesy Garrison Doctor

With this in mind, guests can feel good knowing that a stay at the property helps keep these programs alive. Plus, they can get involved by going on conservation tours guided by dedicated natural resource specialists. During those trips, you will learn about conservation efforts on the properties and the numerous endangered species they have positively impacted.

He added, “after seeing the results of our 20-year Rio Grande cutthroat trout restoration project, driving next to bison, and seeing a gang of hundreds of wild elk, many of these world travelers have fallen back in love with the U.S. landscape.”