Jennifer Fisher Talks About the Importance of Mother-daughter Travel

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It’s no coincidence that Fisher’s business ventures were all inspired by her children.

For Fisher, family comes first—in every sense of the phrase. Now, after crossing seas with her daughter to Tokyo, Fisher explains the importance of mother-daughter travel and how to make the most of the experience.

It comes as a surprise that until recent (aside from passing through an airport en route to Bali) someone as cultured as jewelry designer Jennifer Fisher had never been to Tokyo. “As a family, when I was younger, we traveled mostly in the United States. We would go to places like Jackson Hole, Oregon, and Montana. We never really traveled internationally,” the California-native explained, “which is why it is important for me to take my kids abroad now.”


Courtesy Jennifer Fisher

Usually, Fisher takes her family to places like St. Barths, Anguilla, Bahamas, Aspen, and California, where her extended family is also based. But this spring break, she decided to take her first solo trip (or as she describes it “our maiden voyage of mother-daughter trips”) with her 12-year-old daughter, Drew, to Tokyo. “Having an older son, and Drew being the younger one, it is so special for us to be together and do something without the guys being around. Just having one-on-one time together without the rest of the family is incredibly important.”


Courtesy Jennifer Fisher

Being a self-proclaimed foodie, Fisher wanted to expose her daughter to the different types of food and have a true international experience. “We went for the best ramen and we went for the best sushi,” including Kagari in Ginza for truffle broth, Tapas Molecular Bar (“One of the most amazing experiences was our dinner here with all this molecular astronomy. They serve 12 courses. Drew loved everything and it was a fun food exploration to do.”), Zoo Ice Cream in Harijuku, Flippers in Shibuya for the famous Japanese soufflé pancakes, Afuri underground in the train station for fast-casual ramen, Yotaro in Roppongi for Omakase tempura dinner, the Tsukiji Fish Market for Iso Sushi, and Bread Works in Aoyama, among many others.


Courtesy Jennifer Fisher

Related: Jennifer Fisher’s Guide to Paris

The two also explored the shops and temples. “Drew loved Harajuku, Shinjuku, as well as Shibuya and the Shibuya Crossing—that was especially cool for her to see. We went to the Temples and they were amazing. I think she enjoyed the Temples more than some of the touristy things we did.”


Courtesy Jennifer Fisher

Of course, the duo didn’t come back empty-handed. For Drew, who is interested in stationary and crafting, “we went to Tokyo Hands and to Itoyo, and places like Loft.” And Fisher, naturally, “brought back a ton of weird kitchen gadgets and lots of amazing rice cakes we found on the way to the temple, where there’s a long strip of vendors and a family who made rice cakes.” As well the lessons they’ll always carry, “I try to teach Drew the difference in customs, greetings, how to address people, make eye contact, and to be respectful. And in terms of formality and learning about different cultures, Tokyo was a great place to teach her some of those lessons.”


Courtesy Jennifer Fisher