This Sunflower-inspired Residential Tower Puts Green Space First

Courtesy odD+ Architects/Julia Bogdan

And it’s got some stunning windows to boot.

If you’ve always wanted a home with a stunning space for your plant collection, pack your bags for Ecuador. OdD+ Architects—a firm based in Quito—recently unveiled their plans for a new residential tower in its home city. The structure is inspired by sunflowers, but not in the way you may be thinking.


Courtesy odD+ Architects/Julia Bogdan

The design takes cues from the flower, specifically the geometric way in which the petals and seeds are naturally formed. The resemblance isn’t immediate, which only adds to the intrigue. Each unit in the building has its own balcony area complete with a living garden—perfect for a city dweller looking for a much-needed dose of nature. We’re not talking about a small row of plants, either; the trees and plants incorporated into the terrace design are significant and also add a bit of privacy that’s not often found in the middle of a city. The green space is no last-minute addition; its intention is to attract more pollinators and birds to the city center, according to Arch Daily.


Courtesy odD+ Architects/Julia Bogdan


Courtesy odD+ Architects/Julia Bogdan

Quito’s location near the equator also provides a very unique opportunity to nurture an eco-focused structure, given the strong sunlight the city gets. With that in mind, The Sunflower Tower will also focus on sustainability. “This assembly is based on repetition, generating a biophilic skin that positions the project towards an equilibrium between the built and the natural world,” OdD+ Architects shared with Designboom. “With the ability to thrive all year round, incorporating a self-sustaining ecosystem into the built environment reduces the tower’s carbon footprint, and creates a constant and direct connection with nature.”


Courtesy odD+ Architects/Julia Bogdan

Less important, but also notable: The arches featured throughout the building’s facade make for some pretty incredible window situations. Here’s to hoping the future is filled with more buildings blurring the line between nature and human-made structure, with a heavy dose of plant life along the way.