From Our Archive
This story was published before Summer 2021, when we launched our new digital experience.

Noticed

Names and places

MOST READ TRAVEL
The New Name in Thai Hospitality

Destinations

The New Name in Thai Hospitality

With Cape & Kantary, hotelier Tirawan Taechaubol breathes new life into the...

How to Make the Perfect Cup of Italian Coffee

Food and Drink

How to Make the Perfect Cup of Italian Coffee

Unpacking the history, allure, and ways to use the humble Moka pot.

Benevolent Spirits

Wine and Spirits

Benevolent Spirits

A selection of alcohol-free mixers and aperitifs for a healthy, holistic cocktail...

A letter, says Emily Post, is "a mirror which reflects your taste and character." So what does it mean when people stamp their names sideways, upside down, even smack in the middle of their notecards? Relax, says Megan Kuntze of Crane & Co.'s new Black Label couture line: "The only rule in stationery today is that there are none." 800-572-0024

UPPER LEFT
For those who can't completely wean themselves off Emily Post: a twist on tradition that shows a little more flash with only a little more risk.

CENTERED
Based on the style of 19th-century French calling cards. But where do you write? Simply pretend it's not there and scribble as usual.

TOP AND BOTTOM
The "reflection" treatment may be narcissistic, but it's also practical. "The trend is shorter, more concise notes," Kuntze explains.

SIDEWAYS
The iconoclastic approach. There is no traditional or practical basis for this one, but Kuntze reports it is becoming increasingly popular.

LOWER RIGHT
Approximates a handwritten sign-off. (Virginia Woolf supposedly favored this style.) For a personal touch, Kuntze says, "get your signature engraved."

Newsletter

Let’s Keep in Touch

Subscribe to our newsletter

You’re no longer on our newsletter list, but you can resubscribe anytime.