The Best Rosé Wines to Drink This Year

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Spring is the perfect time to open a bottle of rosé, and these ones are the best to be drinking now.

The warmer seasons are often thought of as the best time to drink rosé wine, and there are plenty of new vintages and classic bottles available to try this year from producers around the world. To get some tips on choosing the right rosé for you, we turned to Amy Racine, Beverage Director at JF Restaurants (The Times Square EDITION, The Loyal). “There's often a lot of truth in the color of the rosé,” she said. “As a rule of thumb, the paler the shade of pink, the lighter, drier, and brighter the wine. On the darker end of pink shades, we often have riper, more concentrated fruit flavors, and a little more body and roundness.” 

Related: The Best Red Wines to Drink This Year

She recommends trying a rosé from a wine region you’ve never explored before because the difference in flavors is not as extreme as it is with red wine, so you’ll likely find something that suits your palate. Rosé can be paired with lots of different kinds of food, according to Racine, but you should pay attention to the style of the wine. “For cooler days, a fuller rosé that can be served at a slightly warmer temperature [works],” she said. “Or, if having the bottle with a heartier meal like paella with chorizo or smoky barbecue, a darker, more concentrated style is a better route. If you're looking for something to sip on its own or with salads and lighter bites, a clean, dry, and pale style might be better. On a hot day, that ice cold pale rosé is especially refreshing.”

Here are ten excellent rosé wines to drink all spring and summer long.

Château Minuty 281 2019


Courtesy Château Minuty

There are several rosé wines available from France’s Château Minuty, including Minuty Prestige 2019, which is now available for the first time in the US. But the pinnacle rosé from this family-owned estate, located on the Saint Tropez peninsula, is Château Minuty 281, named after the dripping blue Pantone color on the bottle. The 2019 vintage is bright and lively with notes of white stone fruit and citrus. $90 

Cakebread Cellars Vin de Porche Rosé 2019


Courtesy Cakebread Cellars

Cakebread Cellars’ 2019 vintage of Vin de Porche is a blend of 93 percent Pinot Noir and seven percent Syrah grown in the estate vineyards of Napa’s Anderson Valley. This is a nice dry rosé, with notes of berries and melon matched with a bit of acidity. According to the winery, it’s meant to be enjoyed throughout the summer months while seated comfortably on your porch - hence, the playful name. $28

Related: The Best White Wines to Be Drinking Now

Antica Terra 2017 Angelicall


Mary Schroeder/Blue Window Creative/Courtesy Angelicall

Antica Terra is located in Oregon’s Willamette Valley, which is a relative newcomer to winemaking. This 2017 vintage was made a bit untraditionally by allowing the liquid to ferment on the grape skin for a bit longer than usual (about a week), then filling barrels before it ends up becoming red wine. Look for a hint of smoke on the nose, with some saline and vegetal notes on the palate. $110 

Costaripa Lombardy Valtenesi Chiaretto Rosamara 2018


Courtesy Costaripa

This Northern Italian winery is located not far from the Swiss border in the Lombardy region. Rosamara is made using a “teardrop” vinification method, which according to the winery uses stationary draining before fermentation to get “the heart of the grape.” Expect to find a fruity nose with pops of citrus, and slight almond notes on the palate. $23 

Mumm Napa 2014 DVX Rosé


Robert M. Bruno/Wine Country Photography/Courtesy Mumm Napa

This sparkling rosé from Mumm Napa is made up of a combination of Pinot Noir and Chardonnay, with a dosage of 9.5 g/L. This blend is made up of just seven selected wines, with a small amount of red Pinot Noir added for color. A sip reveals a creamy palate with notes of ripe cherry, oak, and toasted bread and butter. $80

Diora La Belle Fête Rosé


Jason Tinacci/Courtesy Diora

This wine from California’s Diora Wines is mostly Pinot Noir with a bit of Grenache and Chenin Blanc in the blend as well. The grapes are grown at the family’s San Bernabe Vineyard in Monterey. This is the first release of the wine, and it brings notes of fresh summer berries paired with a bit of acidity to every sip. $20

2019 Endless Crush Single-Vineyard Rosé


Courtesy Inman Family 

The 2018 vintage of Endless Crush consisted of a trio of rosé wines from California’s Inman Family Wines, each focusing on a vineyard in a different area of the Russian River Valley. The 2019 vintage, however, is just one organically farmed release, the OGV (Olivet Grange Vineyard) Estate. This excellent wine has subtle flavors of watermelon and tropical fruit on the palate, with a burst of floral notes on the nose. $39 

2019 Malene Cuvée Rosé


Courtesy Malene

Malene Wines brings a French approach to California winemaking, and exclusively focuses on rosé wine. The 2019 Malene Cuvée is bright and vibrant with notes of freshly squeezed citrus, summer berries, and a bit of stone fruit on the palate. This is a clean wine that pairs well with many different types of food. $22

2019 Cenyth Rosé


Courtesy Cenyth

This new vintage from Cenyth and winemaker Hélène Seillan is made from 100 percent Cabernet Franc, one of two wines that she makes at the winery. There are fragrant notes of fruits like crisp pear and apple, complemented by floral whiffs of honeysuckle and lavender. Overall, this is a highly enjoyable rosé. $35

Bricoleur 2019 Rosé of Grenache


Courtesy Bricoleur

This wine from Bricoleur Vineyards is styled after rosé wine from Provence, and made from 100 percent Grenache grapes. It’s very light in color and flavor, but does not lack complexity or balance with sweet and tart notes that allow flavors of citrus and summer melon to pop. $27