Design Your Home Like a Cartier Boutique As the Famed Jewelry House Puts Its Most Iconic Furniture up for Auction

Pierre-Olivier Deschamps/Agence Vu/Courtesy Cartier

The public sale will feature a Louis XVI giltwood console table.

Cartier is one of the most iconic jewelry brands globally, and stepping into one of their stores is an experience. Now you can have that same luxe experience at home because the French company is auctioning off furniture from its boutiques worldwide.

Artcurial will host the auction in two parts—a physical sale, Cartier dans ses murs, on March 3 and an online sale, Cartier at Home, from March 1 to 8. Both will feature exquisite pieces that embody French classicism and showcase Louis Cartier and Cartier's artistic director Jeanne Toussaint's taste.

RELATED: The Most Iconic Pieces of Furniture Ever Created, According to Interior Designers

Louis XVI giltwood console table in carved and gilded wood
Courtesy Cartier

So, what's on the chopping block? Highlights include a Louis XVI giltwood console table in carved and gilded wood that's estimated to fetch € 15,000-20,000 ($18,000-$24,000). There's also a large Louis XV-style flat desk with European lacquer and a Chinese motif with an estimated price tag of €3,000-5,000 ($3,600-$6,000). And a Louis XV giltwood mirror could go for €3,000-8,000 ($3,600-$9,600).

Louis XV giltwood mirror
Courtesy Cartier

Other items up for sale include 20th-century lamps from Maison Charles, Bagues-style coffee tables, lamps from the 1940s and 50s. The pieces hail from famous destinations like Milan and Paris.

"This furniture reflects a part of Cartier's identity," Pierre Rainero, image, style & heritage director at Cartier, told Departures in a statement. Clear lines, a sense of proportion, harmony of shapes. The French 18th century and classicism inspired both Louis Cartier and Jeanne Toussaint to create the idioms of Cartier."

RELATED: Upgrade Your Mother’s Day Gifting With These Modern Jewelry Heirlooms

Louis Cartier loved the neoclassical style for its simplicity, and it influenced the pieces he designed. He was hands-on when the shop moved from Boulevard des Italiens to 13 rue de la Paix, overseeing the setup of the customer-facing space as well as the offices and lounges. That's why, to this day, you will still find furniture in that style at boutiques around the world. Later, when Jeanne Toussaint was at the helm from 1933 to 1970, her 'Toussaint taste' inspired a more feminine and contemporary touch to the boutiques.

Now, 240 lots from Cartier will be available to the public, with proceeds of the sale going to the Cartier Philanthropy Foundation, which is committed to improving developing countries' living conditions.