Tiffany & Co. Is About to Sell Its Largest Diamond Ever

Thomas Milewski/Courtesy Tiffany & Co.

The reimagined 1939 necklace—featuring an 80-carat diamond—celebrates Tiffany's Fifth Avenue flagship reopening.

Tiffany & Co. is known for crafting some of the most coveted jewelry using the world's best diamonds. After all, the brand owns one of the world's largest and finest yellow diamonds, aptly named the Tiffany Diamond. And while that rare historic gem is not for sale, Tiffany is making another remarkable piece available to a lucky buyer. 

To honor the iconic store's reopening in 2022 after an extensive renovation, the prominent American jeweler scoured the archives for a remarkable piece to put up for sale. The result? A necklace created for the 1939 World's Fair was meant to attract visitors to the store's original grand opening. But, while the original piece featured an aquamarine stone at the center, Tiffany replaced it with an 80-carat diamond.

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Not only is the diamond the largest Tiffany's will ever sell, but it also has a D color grading—the highest, meaning the diamond has nearly no color—and is flawless. The only other diamond in the collection that is bigger is the Tiffany Diamond, which is 128.5. But, again, that was never for sale.

And to bring the stunning gem squarely into the modern era, Tiffany's ensured that it was sourced responsibility from Botswana, Africa. It comes with a provenance that's transparent about its origins and part of its overall traceability commitment. In fact, they were the first major jeweler to reveal the origins of all its newly mined diamonds .18 carats or higher. 

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"What better way to mark the opening of our transformed Tiffany flagship store in 2022 than to reimagine this incredible necklace from the 1939 World's Fair, one of our most celebrated pieces when we opened our doors on 57th Street and Fifth Avenue for the first time," said Victoria Reynolds, Tiffany & Co. chief gemologist. "The new necklace perfectly reflects our brand heritage as a New York luxury jeweler, whose founder was known as the 'King of Diamonds.'"

The final necklace will debut next year with a price tag likely in the eight figures.