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luxury

August 22, 2014
By Kareem Rashed | Shopping, Fashion

201409-b-money-where-your-mouse-is-web-shopping.jpg
Courtesy of Vault Couture; Nataniil/Getty Images / Farfetch; Adrianna Williams/Getty Images / Courtesy of Tinker Tailor; © Nikolai Golovanoff/Corbis / Courtesy of Crest & Co.;PC Plus Magazine/Future Publishing; Getty images.


The latest fashion websites are luxuries unto themselves.

FarFetch.com
The one-stop shop brings together the best independent boutiques, from São Paulo to Stockholm. Shop old favorites like L’Eclaireur in Paris and discover new gems like Mumbai’s Le Mill.

VaultCouture.com
For the globe-trotting clotheshorse, or for anyone with an over­subscribed closet, Vault Couture.com stores clothes and photos of each piece to create a digital wardrobe. Using its site, you can create looks as you would an iTunes playlist and have them delivered to either your home or travel destination.

TinkerTailor.com
Customize pieces from your favorite designers on this ingenious four-month-old website launched by Aslaug Magnusdottir, the brains behind e-retailer Moda Operandi. Longer sleeves? A different shade of faille? Your wish is TinkerTailor.com’s command.

CrestandCo.com
Debrett’s fanatics will curtsy to this veritable online cabinet of curiosities offering rare items with a royal pedigree, such as cuff links by Prince Dimitri of Yugoslavia and briefcases by Böle, purveyor to Swedish royalty.

August 22, 2014
By Kareem Rashed | Fashion, Accessories, Style

New Collectible: M2Malletier
Photo courtesy of James Wojcik

Architectural lines and sumptuous skins give Barcelona-based M2Malletier’s handbag gloriously understated elegance. A detachable shoulder strap makes it as wearable as it is streamlined. Bag, $1,520; owennyc.com.

August 22, 2014
By Kareem Rashed | Fashion

Photo courtesy of James Wojcik

The French are known for their exquisite haute bijoux, but Charlotte Dauphin de la Rochefoucauld is using only diamond pavé and gold to design pieces that are graphic, geometric and voluminous. Cuffs, $37,400 each; maisondauphin.com.

August 22, 2014
By Shannon Adducci | Fashion, Style

New Collectible: Dior
Photo courtesy of James Wojcik

Raf Simons’s “new look” is ladylike with a distinctly modern edge—take these pumps, in organza with intricate embroidery, that recall Roger Vivier’s extravagant mid-century designs for the house. Supremely chic, then as now. Shoes, $2,100; 800-929-3467.

August 22, 2014
By Shannon Adducci | Accessories, Style

New Collectible: Patek Philippe
Photo courtesy of James Wojcik

How does one improve on perfection? The Swiss watchmaker didn’t change a thing on its iconic Calatrava officer’s timepiece (a style they have done since the 1920s). The only difference is a white-gold case and sleek black alligator strap. Watch, $37,000; 212-218-1240.

August 22, 2014
By Shannon Adducci | Fashion, Style

New Collectible: Bruno Cucinelli
Photo courtesy of James Wojcik

Consider navy the new evening standard. The Italian clothier’s handsome version is 100 percent cashmere, with two buttons and available in a silk peak lapel or shawl collar (shown here). Tuxedo, from $8,065; 212-627-9202.

August 20, 2014
By John Lopez | Books

Fall Reads: Haruki Murakami
Photo by Grant Cornett

After the metaphysical fireworks of his epic 1Q84, Haruki Murakami scales back with a deceptively simple novel about a train-station designer whose girlfriend sends him on a mission to uncover why his four closest friends suddenly cut off all contact 15 years ago. To solve the mystery, Tsukuru Tazaki visits both his native Nagoya, Japan, and Finland, provoking a self-examination whose subtle revelations profoundly alter his sense of identity.

More straightforward than the author’s usual fare, Colorless Tsukuru Tazaki sold more than a million copies in its first week on sale in Japan last year. Yet Murakami retains his trademark feel for the surreal with an evocative account of the internal tectonics triggered by investigating one’s willfully buried past. The unadorned novel feels as clear and clean as a glass of water, and the crisp poetry of its emotional insight seems all the more refreshing for it.

Colorless Tsukuru Tazaki and His Years of Pilgrimage, published by Knopf, came out in August.

August 20, 2014
By Rebecca Milzoff | Arts + Culture

Culture Index: Fall's It Girl
Illustration by André Carrilho

Robyn Davidson’s book Tracks seemed tailor-made for a David Lean–style epic: In 1977, Davidson trekked across 1,700 miles of Australian outback, alone but for the company of four camels and a dog. “It’s a difficult book to adapt,” says director John Curran, who first encountered the story when backpacking through Australia in the early ’80s. “It’s first-person, this woman alone in the desert, with a lot of meditative moments.” He nonetheless tackled the memoir, casting Aussie native Mia Wasikowska as the lead. (The film opens September 19.) “As a character, she’s very quiet and reserved but also very sharp—she’s got that writer’s eye,” Curran says. Wasikowska is not the only star: Curran was particularly pleased with his four camel actors. “After a while, it was like the camels knew they were on camera,” he says with a laugh. “When we said, ‘Action,’ they were real hams.”

 

And Six Other Cultural To-Dos

9/4–14: The Toronto International Film Festival, the unofficial start of awards season, kicks off.

9/7: The fifth and final season of Boardwalk Empire premieres today. Will Nucky survive?

9/10–13: Pianist Leif Oves Andsnes plays Beethoven’s first concerto at the San Francisco Symphony.

9/21: Yan Pei-Ming and Bertrand Lavier present new artworks at the Fondation Vincent van Gogh in Arles, France.

9/24: Malian songstress Rokia Traoré performs at the Brooklyn Academy of Music’s Next Wave Festival.

9/27–12/14: London’s Royal Academy of Arts presents the first major retrospective of German painter Anselm Kiefer.

—By Julian Sancton

August 19, 2014
By Julian Sancton | Books

Fall Reads: YSL's Private Marrakech
Photo by Grant Cornett

This year has seen the release of not one but two biopics of Yves Saint Laurent, who died in 2008. One, Yves Saint Laurent, was approved by his longtime partner and business manager, Pierre Bergé. The other, Cannes con­tender Saint Laurent, was not, and had to re-create YSL’s iconic designs from scratch. Both were (unsurprisingly) visually stunning. But the year’s most intimate look at the enigmatic couturier is Bergé’s own moving tribute to his and YSL’s life in Marrakech, titled Yves Saint Laurent: A Moroccan Passion (Abrams, September). First published in French to coincide with a 2010 exhibit at Marrakech’s Jardin Majorelle, the designer’s final resting place, the book takes the form of a journal, with candid photos, YSL’s sketches of Moroccan-inspired haute couture and text scrawled in the 83-year-old Bergé’s shaky hand. The scrapbook feels like an invitation into a circle of fabulous expatriates—with cameos from guests like Andy Warhol, Bianca Jagger, Loulou de la Falaise and Catherine Deneuve—luxuriating in a cloistered, Orientalist reverie.

August 15, 2014
By Sasha Levine | Arts + Culture, Philanthropy

BAM's 24-Hour Movie-Marathon
Photo courtesy of E. Kaufman Harvey

Film buffs, get your popcorn ready. On September 5, 2014, the Brooklyn Academy of Music (BAM) is hosting its first-ever 24-Hour Movie Marathon at the Harvey Theater (651 Fulton St.; 718-636-4100; bam.org), benefiting its arts-education programs that service more than 200 schools and reach over 30,000 students, teachers and parents each year. Starting at 8 p.m., participants will watch a full day’s worth of films back to back, interspersed with breaks for yoga, massages, coffee, wine and food (from Parker Red and Ted & Honey). Here, Stephanie Hughley, BAM’s vice president of education and humanities, and Matthew Bregman, vice president of development, discuss the inaugural event.

Tell us how this idea came to be. 
Matthew Bregman: Because our work is all about encouraging young artists, we wanted to raise money in a creative way, and a movie marathon seemed a really fun way to approach fundraising. That’s part of the message, too—engaging in fundraising doesn’t have to be serious and dull. It can be fun.

Talk about the films you’ll show. How were they curated?
Stephanie Hughley: As the event is a fundraiser for our arts-education programs, we immediately thought a back-to-school theme would be really fun—and there are so many great school-themed films, like Clueless and Dazed and Confused. The special guests who are joining us throughout the event [including celebrities like actor Taylor Schilling and world-champion rock climber Sasha DiGiulian] will be introducing some of the films, so we’ve left room to add their favorites, too.

Any major goals for this fundraiser?
MB: Beyond raising money, we want people to really enjoy themselves and come away from the event feeling even more connected to BAM and more enthusiastic about engaging in this kind of community-building project in the future.

Participants must raise a minimum of $250 through CrowdRise. To register or give support, visit bam.org/moviemarathon. Donations accepted through October 5.

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