RSS

luxury

July 02, 2014
By Caroline Tell | Accessories, Style

American Designers Kara Ross New York
Photo courtesy of Jens Mortensen

The jewelry designer launched her handbag line in 2008, modeling the pieces after her signature jewels, but this year Ross revamped the collection to include gemstone-esque resin clutches and dramatic marble shoulder bags. From $995; kararossny.com.

July 02, 2014
By Caroline Tell | Accessories, Style

American Designers: Rauwolf
Photo courtesy of Jens Mortensen

A veteran of the exotic-skins-centered brand Devi Kroell, Kristine Johannes moved away from animal materials when she introduced her own architectural collection, replacing leather with futuristic-looking mirrors and Plexiglas. From $1,190; rauwolfnyc.com.

July 02, 2014
By Caroline Tell | Accessories, Style

Handbag to Hold: Fairchild Baldwin
Photo courtesy of Jens Mortensen

As the daughter of legendary WWD publisher John Fairchild, Jill Fairchild was destined to work in fashion. Her and partner Karen Baldwin’s new collection has both practical cotton totes for day and modish top-handle bags for night. From $995; fairchildbaldwin.com.

July 02, 2014
By Christina Valhouli | Hotels

A New England Inn Turns on the Charm
Michael J. Lee

Lexington, Massachusetts, is known as the birthplace of the American Revolution. Following a tip from Paul Revere that the British were coming, the first battle shots were fired on Lexington’s Green in 1775.

Today the Boston suburb features historical sites, biotech companies and Nobel Prize–winning residents. And now, for the first time, there is a stylish place to stay. The Inn at Hastings Park, which opened in February, is owned by local resident Trisha Pérez Kennealy, a former investment banker who purchased the inn (a onetime assisted-living home) and two adjacent buildings that are located steps from the Battle Green.

Just 22 bedrooms inhabit the three 19th-century buildings, which include the Isaac Mulliken house and the Barn, a former casket factory. Kennealy hired Lexington interior designer Robin Gannon, of Robin Gannon Interiors, to create a contemporary but streamlined look. “We wanted to stay true to the history of Lexington but give it a modern twist,” says Gannon. “The goal was for the inn to be traditional but not feel like your grandmother’s house.”

The result? A cozy and eclectic spot that looks nothing like grandmother’s house unless grandma happens to be passionate about Sister Parish design. Guest rooms (each decorated differently) are united with bold wallpaper and a palette of tangerine, turquoise and lavender mixed with crisp whites and blues. Gannon showcases New England artisans often, including Peter Fasano wallpaper, Dunes and Duchess candelabras and O & G Studio wood furniture. Some rooms display Americana like flags.

Although the inn is small, it is operated as a full-service hotel. Enjoy breakfast, lunch and dinner at Artistry on the Green restaurant, run by chef Matthew Molloy, formerly of Boston’s Beacon Hill Bistro. The menu highlights fresh, seasonal cuisine, such as native oysters and braised lamb shank with creamy polenta. During our stay, which coincided with Patriots’ Day, the restaurant was packed but service was seamless. A steady stream of locals who had kept an eye on the renovations popped in for a look; Kennealy is aiming for Relais & Châteaux status—a goal that seems within reach. Rooms start at $260 (including breakfast); 2027 Massachusetts Ave.; 781-301-6660; innathastingspark.com.

July 01, 2014
By Julian Sancton | Books

A Beach Read Land of Love and Drowning
Photo courtesy of Ken Goodman

If Land of Love and Drowning (Riverhead) sounds like the title of a long-lost Gabriel García Márquez novel, the comparison is not entirely misleading. Like the work of the late Colombian master, Tiphanie Yanique’s entrancing debut seems to grow out of the soil in which it’s set, in this case the U.S. Virgin Islands. Her heroines are sisters born in the early 1900s, seeking love and status as their Caribbean homeland and its customs become subsumed into the American century. Yanique, who’s earned high praise for her short fiction, divides her time between Brooklyn and her native St. Thomas. Refreshingly, her prose has none of the navel-gazing, sexless glibness so common in Brooklyn literary circles, and instead exhibits a sultry musicality all its own. It’s no surprise to learn she played the steel pan as a child. Calypso echoes through the book, particularly “Rum and Coca-Cola.” (Not the Andrews Sisters’ hit, but the crackly, 1940s Lord Invader version they stole.) There’s plenty of sea, sex, sun and soap-operatic drama, which makes it a perfect summer book. It’s a beach read that’s actually about the beach, not as postcard paradise but as a limbo between land and ocean, known and unknown, myth and reality. —J.S.

July 01, 2014
By Sasha Levine | Food

 Grand Banks Oyster Bar
© Courtesy of Grand Banks

When it comes to summertime, New Yorkers cherish any amount of outdoor space, whether found on a rooftop, a patio or a wooden sailboat docked at Tribeca’s Pier 25.

The 142-foot schooner Sherman Zwicker, built in 1942, lowered its gangplank yesterday and welcomed the public aboard for exhibitions on maritime history, a curated lecture series on aquatic sustainability and an alfresco oyster bar called Grand Banks.

Developed by brothers Alex and Miles Pincus, founders of the sailing school Atlantic Yachting, and restaurateur Mark Firth, co-founder of Brooklyn favorites Diner (85 Broadway; 718-486-3077; dinernyc.com) and Marlow & Sons (81 Broadway; 718-384-1441; marlowandsons.com), the Sherman Zwicker project plays to a seafaring theme. That includes the menu, which, in addition to serving sustainably sourced oysters (Naked Cowboy, Malpeque, Kumamoto), offers seasonal dishes like scallop crudo, lobster rolls and grilled peaches and “nautically inspired” cocktails (many made using Navy strength rum) alongside beer and wine.

While the boat bar will be docked in Tribeca until October, Firth is considering taking the moveable feast elsewhere, with possible stops in Brooklyn, New Orleans and Key West. As he says, “Lets see where the wind blows us.” Pier 25, Hudson River Park; 212-960-3390.

June 30, 2014
By Caroline Tell | Accessories, Style

American Designers: Jill Haber
Photo courtesy of Jens Mortensen

An unlikely designer, Haber has spent more time in a boardroom than a studio, with past gigs ranging from advertising to children’s-book publishing. Now her bright, exotic-skinned clutches are the bags du jour among New York’s Upper East Side circles. From $695; jillhaber.com.

June 30, 2014
By Shannon Adducci | Fashion

Serious Jewelry in the Rocky Mountains: Todd Reed
Photo courtesy of Jens Mortensen

Boulder, Colorado—despite its name—is not exactly the first place one thinks of for ten-carat fancy diamonds, but that’s exactly what designer Todd Reed is working with (in recycled form) at his studio on Pearl Street. Reed will bring his mountain artistry ocean-side in August with a second shop, in Venice, California. Be forewarned: The cuff here is $113,850. toddreed.com.

June 30, 2014
By Julian Sancton | Art

Philip Johnson's Glass House Transformed
©Richard Barnes

Using fog as her medium, 81-year-old Japanese artist Fujiko Nakaya transfigures spaces without touching them. For her installation Veil (on view now through November 30), she has found her most symbolic setting yet: Philip Johnson’s Glass House. Nakaya is shrouding the New Canaan, Connecticut, landmark, which celebrates its 65th anniversary, in a dense mist once an hour, thanks to 600 nozzles hidden in the grass. She complements the transparent walls with their exact architectural opposite: opaque air. From the inside, invisible divisions take form. From the outside, the house seems to disappear in a cloud. The effect becomes all the more mysterious as the fog dissipates and the house emerges as if out of a fairy tale. At 199 Elm St.; theglasshouse.org.

June 30, 2014
By Shannon Adducci | Fashion, Style

Haspel's Summer Style
Photo courtesy of Haspel

Seersucker may have its true origins in colonial British India, but the puckered summertime fabric got its true start in America with Haspel, a New Orleans outfitter that used it for lightweight work wear and, eventually, the modern seersucker suit. Fast-forward 104 years and a few licensing agreements gone awry, and the company is back in the hands of the Haspel family, who enlisted New York designers Sam Shipley and Jeff Halmos to create a new look for the brand.

Their interpretation includes the essential summer suit (from $970) done in a densely woven seersucker that the duo sourced from Italy, along with sportswear basics like colorful chinos (from $195), checked shirts (from $195) and clean polos (from $135)—items new to the traditionally formal brand but inspired by founder Joseph Haspel Sr. himself. “Mr. Haspel enjoyed leisure. He wore seersucker suits, no socks, and lived life to the fullest,” says Halmos. “He was our best inspiration.” haspel.com.

Ti AMG Dep Blog Topics Facets