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Chamber: A 21st-Century Cabinet of Curiosities

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One trip to Chamber, the brand new home and design mecca located under the High Line in the Chelsea neighborhood of New York City, and you’ll try to find a way to move in.

Designed by MOS Architects, the modern, all-white space takes its inspiration from a 17th-century cabinet of curiosities, adapted for contemporary palates. Every two years founder and Museum of Modern Art vet Juan GarcÍa Mosqueda will choose a different designer to curate the boutique’s rotating selection of 100 vintage and limited-edition items of decor, furniture and art by emerging and established talent.

Dutch designers Studio Job have chosen the shop’s inaugural collection, which, along with creations by other talents, will include their designs for a brand new series and a special edition of their Lensvelt furniture (first presented at the 2013 Salone del Mobile). The trove will also feature specially commissioned pieces like a 3D-printed skull sculpture by Nick Ervinck, a handmade oil and vinegar set by Formafantasma and leather paintings by Esther Janssen, alongside objects like Tom Dixon’s utilitarian steel floor lamp and Nendo’s Glas Italia bookshelf. Vintage rarities like a 1956 Borsani desk for Tecno and Delvaux purses will also be on display.

“It’s the idea of having a well-rounded collection that goes beyond trends and stylistic and curatorial pursuits,” says the Argentine-born, Art Institute of Chicago–trained Mosqueda, who is particularly looking forward to selling a fragrance by Fueguia 1833 perfumist Julian Bedel in a Studio Job porcelain bottle, among other items.

“I wanted to bring back the importance of the physical experience by deeply focusing on the analog rather than the digital,” he says. “That’s why it’s essential for Chamber’s visitors to really spend time looking at and hearing the stories behind each of our complex hand-picked objects.” 515 W. 23rd St.; chambernyc.com.

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