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The Kid Stays in the Picture

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James Rosenquist's patented process of fragmenting and recombining advertising imagery has long been out of vogue in the art world. But that may be because the practice—almost single-handedly invented by the Pop maestro—is today such a vital part of television, film, music videos, and even advertising itself. Rosenquist's entire career is examined in a 210-work exhibition that arrives (from the Menil Collection and the Museum of Fine Arts in Houston) at the Guggenheim Museum in New York on October 17. It will be joined by the 86-foot-long painting F-111 (1965), his brilliant fugue on war, consumerism, and domesticity.

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