Masking Tape Masterpieces: How One Art Student Recreates Famous Works of Art With Tape

© Nasa Funahara. All rights reserved. (Used with permission)

Each one takes about a week to make.

Leave all of your preconceived notions about masking tape having the simple task of adhering two things together right here—because it’s simply not true. One look at Japanese artist and student Nasa Funahara’s masking tape masterpieces will change everything you know about this office supply.

Using colored tape and ribbons, Funahara recreates classic pieces of art in her own style: more collage than anything. By placing an image in front of her while she creates the washi tape “paintings,” Funahara is able to mimic the composition of the original while also adding her own twist on the color palette.


© Nasa Funahara. All rights reserved. (Used with permission)

You’ll find that many of her pieces are instantly recognizable, but draw you in to get lost in the patterns and colors of the subjects. The whole project kicked off after showing one of the collages—which was actually school assignment—at a Musashino Art University festival. Spoiler: Everyone loved it.


© Nasa Funahara. All rights reserved. (Used with permission)

Since beginning this hobby, she’s re-created everything from Edvard Munch’s The Scream to Johannes Vermeer’s The Girl With the Pearl Earring. According to DesignBoom, each piece takes her about one week to create and is about the size of a tatami mat.


© Nasa Funahara. All rights reserved. (Used with permission)

The collages are created with washi tape, a traditional Japanese adhesive paper that comes in bright colors and patterns. In an interview with Excite News, Funahara shared that she owns more than 450 rolls of the tape.

You can see more of Funahara’s work on Loftwork, an art portfolio website.