Jean Paul Gaultier's Designer Bedroom

Courtesy Roche-Bobois

Jean Paul Gaultier’s new bed and linens for Roche-Bobois make the bedroom even more seductive.

The French word “boudoir” has its origins in boudeur, or sulky, and there is perhaps no better example than Jean Paul Gaultier’s brooding bedroom set, shown here. For its 50th anniversary, French furniture company Roche-Bobois teamed with the designer to create a 250-piece limited-edition home collection that fuses its sturdy designs with Gaultier’s iconic themes and motifs. There are modular sofas with handmade cushions covered in his signature sailor stripes and calligraphy prints—his take on Roche’s classic Mah Jong sofas, originally designed by Hans Hopfer—plus red-lacquer mirror trolleys, nine-tier trunks and portable laminated aluminum armchairs emblazoned with “Gaultier.” But the bed lends itself to the more provocative designs of the fashion world’s enfant terrible. The Lelievre duvet and sheets are done in powdered satin and topped with sailor-stripe blankets, and the corset throw pillows pay homage to Gaultier’s designs for Madonna’s “Blond Ambition” tour in the 1990s. An aluminum and chrome rolling screen and a mirrored armoire, both adorned in the designer’s tattoo prints, complete the room. And if you’re looking for an ensemble to accompany this setting, one of Gaultier’s new cone-bra-and-panty sets for La Perla should do the trick. Prices start at $2,185 for a bedding set; Paravent queen bed with rolling screen, $11,560; rochebobois.com.

Ask the Expert: Bedmaking with Event Designer David Monn

The key to a perfectly made bed starts with crisp, unwrinkled sheets. My secret: Once washed, fold them up as small as possible, roll tightly and put in the freezer overnight. Yes, people will call you crazy, but trust me, it works. The next day, simply shake them out, iron them and put them on the bed.

When it comes time to add the top sheet, include a foot fold, a trick for creating extra room in the sheets at the foot of the bed so your feet don’t feel pinned down. They do it at London’s Lanesborough Hotel, and it felt so comfortable that I asked the butler to teach me his method. Leave eight inches of sheet to spare at the head of the bed (this will fold down later over your blanket). At the foot of the bed, take the sheet in both hands and fold an eight-inch pleat toward yourself. Then add the blanket, fold down the overhang at the head and tuck in all around. It’s very simple, but it makes all the difference sliding into bed at night!