The Outsiders

Geoffrey Kent: The Pioneer

Born and raised in Kenya, Kent started Abercrombie & Kent in 1962 with “a hundred pounds, an old Land Rover, and a dream the size of Kilimanjaro.” The travel outfitter went on to revolutionize the luxury tent safari with electricity and refrigeration—not to mention caviar and Champagne. He has now created experiences for clients in every imaginable corner of the globe: pioneering Antarctica, observing now-extinct gorillas in the Belgian Congo, and spending time with the pygmies of central Africa. The 66-year-old recently added the Abercrombie & Kent Extreme Adventures program. South Pole skiing, anyone? Kent wears a Loro Piana suede jacket ($3,275) and Canali linen shirt ($225) and pants ($495) with Tod’s Gommini loafers ($345).

Philippe and Alexandra Cousteau: The Legacies

Jacques Cousteau showed the world what lived under the sea. His grandchildren keep his mission alive by trying to save it. “How we manage our water resources,” says granddaughter Alexandra, 32, “will be the century’s defining issue.” She’s about to embark on a global expedition for a book on solutions to the water crisis. Brother Philippe Cousteau Jr., 28, chief ocean correspondent for Animal Planet, is the vision behind Oceans, a BBC-Discovery series that will investigate the condition of our major bodies of water. “You have to get the message out in a fun, sexy way,” he says. “It can’t be all doom and gloom.” Philippe wears a Calvin Klein Collection neoprene mesh suit ($1,495) and shoes ($375), Dior Homme shirt ($470), and Kobold Large Soarway Diver watch ($3,650). Alexandra wears a Giambattista Valli caftan ($2,175), Siman Tu necklace ($1,045), and Van Cleef & Arpels ring ($3,900) with Manolo Blahnik shoes.

Christy Turlington: The Model as Adventuress

If any supermodel has redeemed herself from the “I don’t get out of bed for less than $10,000 a day” era, it’s Turlington. “My modeling career,” she says, “is what allowed me to offer much of my life to service.” Her work for the Red campaign and as a CARE ambassador tapped into her explorer’s spirit: She already has a Kilimanjaro climb under her belt and recently embarked on a pilgrimage to Badrinath, an Indian village near the Tibetan border. Once-routine jaunts to Paris and Milan have been replaced with trips to Tanzania, Madagascar, Swaziland, El Salvador, and Peru. Turlington wears a Nina Ricci leather jacket ($4,490) and James Perse tank ($50) and shorts ($25) with her own Nasimiyu necklace (worn as bracelet).

Jimmy Chin: The Natural

Expedition photographer Chin, 34, has chronicled his trek across the largely unexplored Chang Tang Plateau in Tibet, accompanied climbing legend Ed Viesturs on his journey up the last of all fourteen 8,000-meter peaks in the world, ascended Pakistan’s Karakoram mountains, and skied from the summit of Mount Everest—all with camera in hand and photo equipment on his back. Now based near Jackson, Wyoming, Chin, a North Face–sponsored athlete, goes on assignment for National Geographic and Outside magazines. “Being able to capture the moments I have up there is important to me,” he says. “I hope my pictures show nonclimbers the boundlessness of human potential.” Chin wears a Jil Sander cotton shirt ($410).

Matthew Bogdanos: The Fighter

Bogdanos is a rare breed: a U.S. Marine colonel, a Manhattan assistant district attorney, a classics scholar, a pro-trained boxer. “My life has been a series of things I wasn’t good enough at,” says Bogdanos. His humility landed him in the Marines, where he led the mission to recover the artifacts stolen from Iraq’s national museum during the Iraq war. “These aren’t just pieces of cracked alabaster,” he says of the antiquities, more than 6,000 of which he and his team returned. “They’re a reminder of our shared heritage—our common humanity.” All proceeds from his book, Thieves of Baghdad (Bloomsbury), fund the museum’s ongoing search. Bogdanos wears a Michael Bastian jacket ($2,435), Luigi Borrelli shirt ($450), Loro Piana belt ($260), and Brunello Cucinelli pants ($575) with Bally boots ($660).

Tee Faircloth: The Upper East Sider

F. M. Allen, Faircloth’s five-year-old outfitter on New York’s Madison Avenue, is filled with antique zebra-skin travel trunks, silver serving trays, and other relics of the colonial safari. But don’t let the old-world atmosphere fool you: It’s his high-performance khaki jackets and pants designed to endure extreme conditions, that really draw the crowds (40 of the Forbes 400 became clients in his first year of business). A former Wall Street bond trader, Faircloth tries out every piece of clothing during his global expeditions to Botswana and Tanzania with friends and clients, like model Shaundra Hyre photographed above. Faircloth wears an F. M. Allen DeserDry safari jacket ($280) and shirt ($75) with his own vintage Levis 501 jeans and Red Wing boots. She wears a Christian Dior dress ($7,420) with Siman Tu necklace ($750).