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August 28, 2014

How Thomas Keller Scrambles Eggs

By Jason Chen | Food, Home + Design

How Thomas Keller Scrambles Eggs
Photo courtesy of Serge Bloch

Thomas Keller first collaborated with All-Clad more than a decade ago, and now the brand is launching the new All-Clad TK collection together with the chef, who opened The French Laundry in Yountville, California, 20 years ago. The 15-piece collection features flared edges for drip-free pouring, universal lids (which sit flush against the rim of the cookware, so only three are needed across the entire collection) and a wider base for faster heating at lower temperatures. “We really wanted to make cookware more practical for the home cook,” says Keller. “There are fewer pieces because each item is multifunctional—it all makes much more sense.” One of the chef’s favorite recipes is scrambled eggs made in the two-quart saucier, which features a uniquely curved shape that allows him to whisk the eggs without having anything stick to the corners. A four-piece set begins at $800; williams-sonoma.com.


OEUFS BROUILLÉS (Scrambled Eggs) 

Serves Two

INGREDIENTS

  • 4 farm-fresh eggs
  • 2 tbsp unsalted butter
  • 1 1/2 tbsp crème fraîche, such as Kendall Farms brand
  • Kosher salt, to taste 

DIRECTIONS
Break eggs into a mixing bowl and beat until homogeneous. (You can also use a blender.) Strain eggs through a sieve into All-Clad TK 2-quart saucier. Add butter and place pan over a medium-low flame. Continually whisk over heat until mixture begins to thicken and form fine curds that are still very creamy and not completely set. Whisk in crème fraîche and cook for a few seconds longer. Season to taste with salt. (Add freshly ground pepper or fresh herbs such as chives or dill, if desired). Spoon eggs onto warm plates and serve right away.

NOTE
I prefer to eat my eggs soft and somewhat creamy with small curds, but if you prefer your eggs with larger curds or more well done than I do, whisk less and cook more. Thomas Keller

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